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Frank P.
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Posted on Tuesday, April 26, 2005 - 7:30 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

hello,

i am trying to build the solar battery that is on this web site, but I can't get my hands on a electric stove, would it work if I used a gas stove?

If anyone knows, or has tryed it with a gas stove please help me.

thanks,

Frank
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MadScientist (madscientist)
Member
Username: madscientist

Post Number: 17
Registered: 4-2005
Posted on Tuesday, April 26, 2005 - 8:25 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Not sure about this, but I think the main reason for electric rather than gas (any safety issues aside) is probably due to the differences that would be encountered when the copper is heated by an exposed flame. There may be compounds other than water and CO2 that are present in the exhaust that could interfere. Worst case on this, I would imagine, is that it just wouldnt work.

Sometimes (since I have a gas stove) when I need more controlled heat (usually just to spread the heat more evenly), I'll take something else and place it in between the 'target' and the flame. Stainless steel comes to mind, because for the most part, its inert. If this isnt readily available, another sheet of copper MIGHT be enough to keep the gasses from directly interacting with your target. I really cant say either way, I havent built the cell, Although the thought has crossed my mind. Post the results, let us know :-)
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Frank P.
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Posted on Wednesday, April 27, 2005 - 9:01 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

thanks Mad Scientist,

I will try it this weekend
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Kenneth (Storm4)
New member
Username: Storm4

Post Number: 1
Registered: 11-2005
Posted on Wednesday, November 30, 2005 - 6:41 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I used a natural gas stove to cook my copper. It worked just fine. I used a fine sandpaper to polish the copper before cooking. Both sides. Just get it shining. ( No tarnish or fingerprints.) I cooked the copper for an hour at the hottest setting and then turned the burner on it's lowest setting for 30 minutes. Small amounts of the black oxide will start coming off while cooking at the low heat setting. After cooking for the first hour at the highest heat and then lowering the temp to the lowset setting for an additional 30 minutes, turn off the burner and allow the copper to cool for another 30 minutes. The black oxide will really start coming off after the heat is turned off. The 30 minute low heat setting is VERY important. The copper must not cool down too quickly. If it cools too quickly, the black oxide will remain attached to the copper. This is bad. After it is cool, wash off the black oxide under the water faucet. Do NOT rub hard. Just very lightly wash off the loose black stuff. Understand that not all the black oxide will come off but the more that does the better. My copper pieces were 4 inches X 4 1/2 inches and produce 120-140 uA. I built several of the flat panel CD Jewel case cells and ran into problems. I siliconed the "U" shaped piece of copper to the CD case on Day-1 and allowed the silicone to set up. On Day-2, I siliconed the cooked, red, cuprous oxide plate to the "U" shaped copper and allowed to set up. On Day-3, I filled the cell with salt water and cloesd up the funnel hole with silicone. The cells worked fine for a while and then it slowly decreased it's power output. It went from 100 uA to nothing in a matter of 5 - 6 hours. The red cuprous oxide plate of copper was not red anymore. It was shiney copper again. I am not a chemist but I know I am right. I did a little research and found that silicone gives off acetic acid as it hardens (cures). I believe this acetic acid ate the red oxide off the plate. The red oxide is what makes the cell work. To prove my theory, I built a cell using a Glad Freezer bag. It has produced 120-140 uA for over a week now. Look at the attached drawing.
application/octet-streamGlad Freezer Bag Solar Cell
Solar Cell Pictures.doc (26.1 k)

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