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scott (Ichyc)
Advanced Member
Username: Ichyc

Post Number: 100
Registered: 6-2006
Posted on Monday, September 18, 2006 - 1:33 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Well this isant rilly the place to ask but
I dont rilly have any one else to ask.
how dose flux make nicer soldering &
how do I use it to make nicer soldering
jobs?
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Simon Quellen Field (Sfield)
Senior Member
Username: Sfield

Post Number: 1493
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, September 18, 2006 - 11:45 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The purpose of flux is to clean the surfaces of oxidation and other contaminants,
and to keep them clean and free of oxidation while the metal is heated. This
enables a good bond between the solder and the metal.

For electronics, use a solder with rosin-based flux in the core.
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Michael (Michaelt)
Senior Member
Username: Michaelt

Post Number: 101
Registered: 12-2005
Posted on Monday, September 18, 2006 - 11:48 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

When you heat the metal you are attempting to solder to, it can cause additional oxidation of that surface. The flux gets that layer of oxidation off so there is clean metal for the solder to cling and, to some degree, actually alloy with. This makes sure that the solder just isn't sitting on the surface of the metal only to snap or scrape off.

For electronics soldering, use rosin flux (most electronics solder has a rosin flux core). Acid flux is great for soldering to things like stainless steel-- not so great for delicate electronics parts.

Also remember that you use the iron to heat the metal you wish to solder to-- don't use the iron to melt the solder directly, unless you like what is known as a cold solder joint -- they don't tend to work well at all.

This looks like it might be a decent tutorial (haven't found anything glaringly wrong with it): http://www.aaroncake.net/electronics/solder.htm

EDIT: Darnit, thought I was the first poster :-)

(Message edited by michaelt on September 18, 2006)

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